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Shri Mataji

Shri Mataji

I met an elderly couple whilst doing my junk mail run. We started chatting whenever I reached their letter box, until they stopped being in their garden when I walked past.

Weeks went by before Mr Jones called out to me and came to talk. He told me that his wife had been very sick and since then she had “terrible nerves and couldn’t do anything”. She wasn’t even leaving the house and just wanted to stay in bed. He said that he had been told that I taught meditation and asked me if I would come to their house and teach his wife to meditate to see if that would help her. Normally, I would never agree, but these people were in their 80s, and I could feel how much concern and love he had for his wife. So I agreed.

Mrs Jones invited me to sit next to her on the lounge. We began talking, and I explained how Sahaja Yoga worked. I showed her the green meditation card with the photograph of Shri Mataji and explained the process of Self-realisation. I put the card down as I showed her where to place her hands and explained the affirmations. I felt the vibrations flowing as we closed our eyes for her to receive her realisation. The vibrations became very strong, and so I guided her through a short meditation.  Finally, we opened our eyes. I looked at Mrs Jones. Her eyes were filled with tears. I asked her how she felt. She replied with a smile, “I feel relaxed for the first time since…”  She never finished the sentence but just took hold of my hand.

We sat and enjoyed another short meditation. Then I left, telling her that I would come back in a week. When I returned Mrs Jones told me that she had been meditating twice a day and that she felt a lot better.

A few days later I saw the local doctor.

“Look at you!” she exclaimed. “I feel like I’m looking at a completely different person! What have you been doing?”  I told her that I was still meditating. For some reason, I mentioned Mrs Jones.  The doctor replied, “Yes, I know. I saw her yesterday. It’s remarkable what you have done for her.”

I felt so humbled because I knew that I had not done a thing. I wandered into the chemist shop to buy soap. To my amazement, I received the same kind of reception from the chemist. I gave the same reply to the question of what I had been doing. Once again, I was incredibly humbled and, to be honest, stunned as the chemist said, “It’s amazing to see the change in Mrs Jones. She told me about the meditation and said that she’s been out gardening, and she’s even had her hair done.”

This experience reminded me that it is just pure desire and thoughtless awareness that enables Self-realisation and nothing more. We actually do nothing.  I also learned that you are never too old to be transformed. Mrs Jones was proof that Sahaja Yoga absolutely transforms a person, including the person “giving” realisation.

Lisa Barron

chakra_sahasrara_1_

Sahasrara chakra

We have no idea of the effect that we can have on the people we meet in everyday life, once we have our realisation.

I tutor a ten-year-old boy, Pete. He wasn’t staying on task in his classes, was disruptive and, of course, never did his homework. His parents asked me to tutor him and “just make him do his homework.”

He proved a challenge at first. My ego was telling me that I was only managing to get him to do his homework but I was teaching him nothing. I was feeling a little deflated by the lack of results, until I remembered the affirmation that Shri Mataji taught us: “Shri Mataji, You do everything, and I do nothing.”

Half-way through our third session, my pupil stopped his work and wiggled his little finger and his ring finger on his right hand, telling me that they were all hot and tingly. I asked him if this had happened before. He replied, “Na, just now.”

I was in awe as I realised that his right heart and ego were beginning to clear just by us sitting there! The little finger on the right hand is connected to the heart chakra, and the ring finger is connected to the Agnya chakra. Both of these chakras were beginning to clear out.

Pete settled into our routine. He began to take more care with his homework. I resigned myself to the fact that I would not be able to teach him very much in our sessions as homework was all that we had time to do.

A few weeks went by, and his mother told me that he no longer had to bring home a “behaviour book” daily. A couple of months later, his mother went to a parent-teacher interview.

“Well, something good is happening,” she told me. “His teacher said that he wants to do his work now, she rarely has to correct his behaviour, and he pulls his mates up when they muck around, telling them to get on with their work.”

This was nothing short of a miracle! When I first met Pete’s mother, she had told me that his teacher and the principal told her that he had Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and needed medicating. She had even taken him to a paediatrician who decided that he did not have ADHD but was just a handful.

Once again, I was absolutely humbled and in awe of the remarkable effect of vibrations. I hadn’t done a thing. It was the vibrations that had brought about the change in Pete. By doing nothing, absolutely anything and everything can work out.

So when you are in a crowd, in a queue shopping in a busy supermarket, or surrounded by noisy children, just put your attention on your Sahasrara chakra at the top of the head. You will be surprised by how things work out for those around you. What can happen is beyond our understanding!

Lisa Barron

Freedom and Liberation is the title of an inspiring new film about the life of Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi. Having premiered in Germany in 2007, the film will shortly be shown in many countries of the world to celebrate the 85th Birthday of Shri Mataji, on 21 March 2008.

Freedom and Liberation traces the life of Shri Mataji from her very early years growing up in India as Nirmala Salve, the daughter of Prasadrao and Cornelia Salve. While the family was wealthy, having descended from the Indian Shalivahan dynasty, all that was to change with the coming of Mahatma Gandhi’s Independence movement, working to free India from many centuries of British rule. Shri Mataji had already met Gandhi and stayed at his ashram on many occasions. Gandhi was very fond of Nirmala, and recognised that there was something very special about her.

Film poster for

As Shri Mataji’s parents were very active in the Independence movement, helping to organise protests against British rule, they went to gaol many times. As a small child, she was often left to look after the family. From living in large, expensive homes, the family came to live in huts. However, the children knew how important their parents’ fight was.

With the coming of freedom in India, Shri Mataji was able to turn her attention to her vision, the liberation of human beings from the chains of ego, greed, hatred and conditionings. She knew that she had a special task to undertake, but it was many years before she started her spiritual work. In the meantime, she married, became a mother and then a grandmother. As her husband, Sir CP Srivastava, was a distinguished diplomat and later Secretary-General of the United Nations Shipping Corporation, she moved in very high-level circles.

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One day, however, Shri Mataji realised that she had to do something to save humanity from the fraudulent “gurus” who were robbing, misguiding and ruining people in the name of spirituality. She meditated deeply for a long time, and on the night of 5 May 1970 she opened the Sahasrara of the world, an event that symbolised the next great step in the evolution of humankind.

From this time, her real work began. Starting with small groups in India, she developed a unique method for giving realisation to people. Then she developed a method for giving realisation en masse, to many thousands of people at a time. She called this method Sahaja Yoga.

After moving to London because of her husband’s work, Shri Mataji gave realisation to groups of people in England. From this time, she began to travel tirelessly , first to Europe and then further afield, talking to people and giving realisation. Her message spread throughout the world, and today Sahaja Yoga is practised in over 100 countries.

The film is unique in that it shows recent interviews, not previously seen, of Shri Mataji and her family. It provides insights into the tremendous love, compassion and humility of Shri Mataji  that drove her to undertake this enormous work.

The film was made in Germany, directed by Carolin Dassel and produced by devifilm GbR (Carolin Dassel and Joseph Reidinger). If you want to find out more about the film, follow the link: www.freemeditation.com/freedom

During March 2008, the film is being shown all over the world. If you want to have details of screening sessions in Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, New Zealand and Romania, follow the link: www.freemeditation.com/freedom

Film session times for Australia are shown below:

Australian Capital Territory
Belconnen
Friday 14 March, 7.00pm
Belconnen Theatre, Belconnen Community Centre, Chandler Street, Belconnen

New South Wales
Sydney: Contact (02) 9037 5837

Strathfield
Saturday 15 March, 7.30pm to 10.00pm
Strathfield Town Hall, Cnr Homebush Rd and Redmyre Rd, Strathfield

Cremorne
Monday 17 March, 6.30pm to 9.00pm
Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace, 380 Military Rd, Cremorne

Paddington
Tuesday 18 March, 6.30pm to 9.00pm
Chauvel Cinema, Paddington Town Hall, Cnr Oxford St & Oatley Rd, Paddington (entrance on Oatley Rd)

Katoomba
Sunday 16 March, 3 pm
Edge Cinema, Katoomba

Avoca
Saturday 15 March, 2.00pm
Avoca Beach Picture Theatre, Avoca Drive, Avoca

Queensland
Cairns
Friday 28 March, 7.30pm to 9.30pm.
Meeting Room, Cairns City Council Library, Abbott St, Cairns

South Australia
University of Adelaide
Saturday 15 March, 4.30pm to 7.00pm
Napier Lecture Theatre, University of Adelaide

Goodwood
Saturday 15 March, 4.30pm to 7.00pm
Goodwood Community Centre, 32-34 Rosa Street, Goodwood

Tasmania
Contact: (03) 6245 1476 or 0416 435 278

Hobart
Tuesday 18 March, 7pm
Community Centre, Cooper St, Glenorchy

Burnie
Wednesday 19 March, 7.00pm
Health Centre, Jones St, Burnie

Devonport
Thursday 20 March, 12.00 noon
Library, 21 Oldaker Street, Devonport

Launceston
Thursday 20 March, 7.00pm
Community Centre McHugh St, Kings Meadows

Victoria
Contact: 1300 742 242

Melbourne
Friday 14 March, 7.30pm to 9.30pm
Saturday 15 March, 7.30pm to 9.30pm
Treasury Theatre, Treasury Place, Melbourne

Aboriginal dancer at Apology CeremonyMany of us, looking at the current situation with Australia’s Indigenous population, could form the view that their condition is a reflection of much deeper problems facing modern society – dispossession, displacement, disadvantage.
 
I found myself at Martin Place on a grey and rainy Sydney Wednesday morning, with a surprisingly large number of my fellow citizens, listening to the Prime Minister’s apology to the Stolen Generations of Aborigines. There was a real sense of the unity and wellspring of community goodwill, which has swept our nation over the preceding few days, which could not be manufactured.  It has been invigorating to witness this spirit unfold as a spontaneous, collective community expression of the highest principles and ideals. The unity of all people, the importance of reconciliation – it was a time when people across our country, separated by race, have become united in something beyond the mundane, commonplace, and routine, by the need to apologise and to heal.
 
At times it has felt similar to the spirit which pervades a large gathering at a Sahaja Yoga event, being felt and experienced right across our country. People everywhere were experiencing collective awareness, and were sharing the joy of an open-hearted expression of real forgiveness.
 
As Shri Mataji has indicated, a conflict between the forces of evolution and those of devolution are ever at play. The day of apology was an occasion when the heart triumphed over the head, a time for love to triumph and to purge hatred and division from the body of our country, and to move away from racism, discrimination, segregation.
 
The day of apology was a time for the expression of a much more enlightened view of a type rarely seen in public. The opinions of our national leaders were focussed more towards introspection and self-evaluation, on the question of the moral integrity and spiritual wellbeing of our nation.
 
Popular wisdom was that as soon as John Howard had retired, the new Prime Minister – of either political persuasion – would induce Parliament to apologise to Aborigines for past wrongs, and so it turned out to be the case. 

Will its contribution mean an end to Australia’s particular form of apartheid, in which Aborigines are reduced to invisibility in everyday life? Except as issues, not many of us know a single Aboriginal face. They are truly the invisible men and women of Australia, usually only seen or read about in the news.
 
It is hoped that the official, heartfelt National Apology is one of those “great-leap-forward” concepts our nation can pursue, in its efforts to enable Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples to see one another more clearly.
 
Many events pull our citizens onto the streets – days celebrating sporting success, or commemorating a great historical event. These are days of joyful celebration. But this day, when so many were united in our community, celebrating something much more important and unique, was a mighty day, more important perhaps than many others before it.
 
J.K. Galbraith once remarked that the tribulations at the margins of society would eventually upset the contentment at its centre. It seems as if the time has come when the Australian Government realised that the human spirit has to be nurtured through forgiveness, together with a renewed commitment for the future.
 
As one walked through the city on this day, people in business suits and those in shorts and T-shirts, all seemed to be equally affected by the gravity of the occasion, the magnitude and depth of this moment in our history.  By all measures it was a stunning day, and hopefully its great purpose will succeed if it provides a new beginning, and insights into the dignity of Indigenous culture. With our positive desire it will also play a larger role in reconciling a range of issues relevant to all Australians.
 
This was a coming together of people of varied backgrounds, and a collective expression of an apology freely offered and graciously accepted. It gives us a glimpse of what a wider, enlightened society may one day be like, one where the values of selflessness and social improvement, enlightenment and inclusion for our Indigenous population as the great body of the first Australians, can be renewed.
 
It seemed that this one day in our history, filled with noble words and deeds and with that most healing of words, “sorry”, was somehow pitted against years of mean observances, of broken lives, and of families rent asunder. And by some miracle of the human spirit, many of those who had suffered most terribly, found it to be most worthy.
 
Chris Kyriacou

(Photograph: metro.co.uk)

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